How do you authentically teach research?

12 Feb

How are you teaching students to research? When students research in our library, I started noticing a disconnect between personal vs. academic research. By restricting them to academic sources have we stifled their natural curiosity? Is it the linear path we have imposed on them in the past? I have no idea…but I’m constantly thinking about it and looking for more ideas!

 
Although you're far...

Right now I’ve been informally interviewing students on the processes they use when researching. Additionally, I’ve been informally interviewing myself on how I research. Here’s some things I’ve noticed:

  • Curation –  When I’m researching-whether academic or not-I typically pull together a ton of information. I’m constantly shifting it and curating it in to different topics/subjects and leaving my organization open for future use. When I speak with students, they’re focus is usually temporary. They are task oriented and rarely even have the option to curate their research for later. Additionally, students tend to have a more focused view of their research. They struggle to see how it fits in to the big picture.
  • Scaffolding Works – Seriously. Currently, we use digital notecards (on Powerpoint) with students to help them paraphrase. It’s fantastic! They have the opportunity to organize the cards, color code them, and give them themes right there on the cards. Often times I wonder however if we could start this scaffolding earlier in the research process. I’m not sure how though, still working. I think this is one reason Pinterest is so successful! If you’re looking for ways to organize your mantle, you can easily browse through a variety of photos and articles to find what works for you and immediately organize it.

These are my current observations and I’m interested to learn of others experiences. Do you use any strategies to move students from a linear approach to research to a more asynchronous approach?

Using manipulatives to teach the research process

12 Feb

We’re lucky to have classes join us for the entire research process. Here’s an overview of the process we’re currently using. 

Over the past year we’ve noticed some disconnect as students proceed from step to step. In particular, there’s a disconnect between the research notes and the paper. Students work hard paraphrasing, finding information, and correctly citing sources. However, when it comes to moving from notes to paper, they fall short.

So, one day as I was browsing for a couple minutes (hours) on Pinterest, I came across this blog entry: Put Some Excitement into Citations . I love the citation idea and it really got me thinking about ways to incorporate this hands on approach to teaching the research process into our library. I thought I’d share what I came up with and see if anyone has done something similar or has ideas!

Possible Lesson Plan – This is a possible lesson plan to use. It’s still in the works, but I wanted to put it out there and see if anyone had feedback. I imagine this could work as a whole unit or we could pull out little parts of it for minilessons.

Citations and articles

Step One. Students will visit the library and receive four articles in four different colors. They will also receive an envelope with citations for the articles, each citation in a matching color. Students will also receive a guide to look at for help in organizing the citations.

Big Notecard

Part Two. Students will receive half completed, full page, PowerPoint slides to finish with notes from the articles. These will be laminated and they can write on them with wet erase markers. This part will need to be approved by an instructor before they move on. This part may focus on paraphrasing, parenthetical citations, or both! This step offers us the opportunity to identify who is struggling and work with them to help them out. These notecards are exactly the same as the ones we use on the computer.

From here, students will combine the notecards by topic and work on moving them around to create an outline that makes sense for their paper. From this information, they can create a thesis, topic sentences, and really work on identifying how these topics fit together.

Student Worksheet

 (This is a version of the notecard activity for the students to have.)

Debating Problems in History

20 Feb

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

This provides a great resource for teachers looking to incorporate primary sources in to the study of the United States involvement in World War II. Courtesy of UC Berkeley

See on usspotomac.org

DBQ Lessons

20 Feb

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

Great collection of primary source documents relating to the decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

See on www.columbia.edu

Toolkit for Struggling Readers

13 Feb

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

This is an awesome collection of reading strategies. The document begins by describing different types of struggling readers and identifies a grouping of strategies later in the booklet. 

See on www.peterpappas.com

Common Core Skills: Deeper Reading – Critical Thinking

12 Feb

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

Lessons and resources for teachers to implement the Common Core standards – literacy, critical thinking – DBQ for elementary, middle, high school

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

This whole site is a great resource! Great powerpoint on DBQs for students, great lesson plans, and more. Focuses on, as the title implies, deeper reading.

See on www.peterpappas.com

How to Integrate Document-Based History with the Common Core » Copy / Paste by Peter Pappas

12 Feb

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

The four key elements for building critical thinking and close reading skills in history and social studies. Plus 61 pages of historic media.

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

Great resource for teachers struggling with integrating texts into their classroom.  Attention social studies teachers!

 

See on www.peterpappas.com

How to Shift from Teaching Persuasion to Teaching Argument > Eye On Education

12 Feb

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

Persuasive writing has been very popular in ELA classrooms in recent years. During a persuasive writing unit, students are typically asked to write …

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

As Common Core shifts writing methodology, teaching arguments will be new to some teachers. This post shares some differences between teaching persuasion and argument and what this means for the classroom.

See on www.eyeoneducation.com

Vocabulary Strategy: Paint Chips

12 Feb

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

A great strategy for building vocabulary for any student. Using paint chips, teachers provide students with a visual aid to better understand difficult vocabulary. Covers Common Core for the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words.

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

This vocabulary strategy provides students with a tangible way to understand new vocabulary terms. 

See on www.teachingchannel.org

Simplifying Text Complexity via Teaching Channel

24 Jan

See on Scoop.itCommon Core Library Resources

Get a handle on Text Complexity with the help of Sarah Brown Wessling. See a presentation covering Text Complexity that includes the 3 part model for measuring text complexity. She also provides tips on applying Text Complexity to your classroom.

Lindsey Hogan‘s insight:

Excellent video with thorough explanation of text complexity. It’s very approachable, would be great for staff development.

See on www.teachingchannel.org

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